District Court Associate or Supreme Court Tipstaff?

The Crim Law Committee is working on our Criminal Law Careers Guide for all you wonderful aspiring criminal lawyers. In the lead up to its release, Amicus will bring you interviews with a range of criminal law practitioners to give you a bit of an insight into the range of pathways into crime (wait, wha?).

Continue reading “District Court Associate or Supreme Court Tipstaff?”

Advertisements

Interview with Nicholas Cowdery

Hallie Warnock interviews former Director of Public Prosecution Nicholas Cowdery AM QC BA LLB Hon DLaws W’gong FAAL

HW Tell us a bit about yourself and about your career and interest in criminal law.

NC I studied Criminal Law in my first year at Sydney University Law School (the only Law Faculty in the State in my day) and was immediately “at home” with it. I think there were two aspects that grabbed me – the fact that the criminal law was seeking to set standards for the conduct of all persons and to punish transgressors (and the issues those propositions raise) and the personal connection it had with real people in real life situations (in all their diversity and strangeness).

Continue reading “Interview with Nicholas Cowdery”

Ask an Advocate: Agony Uncle

Lisa: Cheer up, Dad. Did you know the Chinese use the same word for “crisis” as they do for “opportunity”?

Homer: Yes! “Crisitunity”.

The Simpsons, Fear of Flying, S 6, Ep 11, (1994)

The mailing list spoke; Aurhett listened. He took your burning questions about advocacy to the ultimate ‘agony uncle,’ Hugh Selby, renowned barrister, witness and advocacy trainer and author.

Continue reading “Ask an Advocate: Agony Uncle”

Interview with Chrissa Loukas SC: on being a public defender, robust and upright advocacy, and the importance of a fair criminal justice system

By Hallie Warnock

In the article “Defending the Unpopular”,[1] Abbe Smith, professor of law at Georgetown University, discusses the importance of the right to legal representation, no matter what the crime. Through comparing experiences in the United States and Australia, Smith explores the negativity surrounding advocacy in the criminal justice system. Ultimately, Smith finds that Australia’s primary duty to the court, in conjunction with the ‘cab rank’ rule, creates a fairer legal environment for the accused than exists in the U.S. Continue reading “Interview with Chrissa Loukas SC: on being a public defender, robust and upright advocacy, and the importance of a fair criminal justice system”